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W. Y. Tindall / James Joyce (1950)

JJBN: TINDALL-1950

Tindall, W. Y. James Joyce: His Way of Interpreting the Modern World. London: Evergreen Books Ltd., 1950. (Uploaded by KOBAYASHI on 17 Sepember 2011)

 

CONTENTS

 

INTRODUCTION
Chapter I    DAEDALUS
Chapter II   HUMANITY
Chapter III  FAMILY CYCLE
Chapter IV  MYTH AND SYMBOL
Appendix
   LIFE AND WORKS
   BIBLIOGRAPHY
   SELECTIVE INDEX

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

This excellent guide to the work of Joyce introduces the reader to one of the truly revolutionary forces in the literature of our time. Writing with a refreshing directness and spontaneity, Professor Tindall opens the way to an enjoyment of Joyce’s major works by explaining their structure, their symbolism, and the linguistic experiments that have often deterred even the most willing reader.
  Summarizing what has previously been written about Joyce, the author further extends this knowledge into the most recent areas of investigation. He discussed in some detail the formal structure of the now classic Ulysses, as well as Joyce’s use of myth, his debt to Freud and Jung, and his far-reaching influence both on his contemporaries and on later writers. He reveals, in Joyce’s alienation from his home, his country, and his religion, the artist’s uncompromising struggle to find within himself the common denominators of mankind, while still preserving his individuality and artistic integrity.
  Despite incredible hardships through much of his life, Joyce continued to experiment with language and with the novel form as if he were completely remaking them; how far he succeeded is shown by the fact that he is generally considered the greatest master of English since Shakespeare. But all his works, even the early stories, Dubliners, present problems and benefit from elucidation, and W. Y. Tindall’s enlightening study will enable the reader to participate more fully in the unique adventure of Joyce’s creative art.   
  WILLIAM YORK TINDALL teaches contemporary English literature in the graduate school of Columbia University and for several years has given a seminar in Finnegans Wake. Besides books on Bunyan and D. H. Lawrence, he is the author of Forces in Modern British Literature, 1885-1946

Hugh Kenner / Dublin's Joyce (1955)

JJBN: KENNER-1955

Kenner, Hugh. Dublin's Joyce. London: Chatto and Windus, 1955. 

(Uploaded by HIRASHIGE on 15 December 2011)

 

CONTENTS


PROLOGUE  Shaking hands with the Corpse

PART ONE  Icarus

  1 Double Writing

  2 The Unquiet Father

  3 The Anatomy of "Love"

  4 Dedalus Abolished

  5 Dubliners

  6 Exiles

  7 Return to Lyric

 

PART TWO  Odysseus

  8 The Portrait in Perspective

  9 The School of Old Aquinas

 10 Baker Street to Eccles Street

 11 Homer and Hamlet

 12 How to Read Ulysses

 13 The Trivium in Dublin

 14 The Plan of Ulysses

 

PART THREE  The Dream of the West

 15 The Stuffed Phoenix

 16 Alice in Chapelizod

 17 The Pale of Words

 18 Vico and History

 19 Three Dreams

 20 Two Selves

EPILOGUE  Four Burials


ABOUT THE BOOK

 

Mr. Kenner, the Canadian scholar well known for his book on Ezra Pound, now turns to another of this century's most influential writers. Criticism has proliferated around the writings of James Joyce; but Mr. Kenner's book is, we believe, the most comprehensive, perhaps the definitive book on this subject. He believes that Joyce's stories and novels not only derive from, but are all essentially a criticism of, the civilization embalmed in pre-1920 Dublin. From this standpoint he discusses them, in great detail, with that lively seriousness which characterizes modern American criticism at its best. He draws our attention to the technique of 'parody, double-writing', which is to be found in everything Joyce wrote - Joyce's Dublin being itself 'in fact an Eighteenth-Century parody'. His wide range of scholarship enables him to pick up an immense number of references, influences, and parallels (for example, in Jonson, Yeats, Ibsen, Flaubert, Lewis Carroll) which have escaped the notice of most critics; while his exposition of the links bewteen Joyce's several works, and his analaysis of their symbolism and verbal texture, are constantly enlightening. Dublin's Joyce does honour both to its author and its great subject.

William M. Schutte / Joyce and Shakespeare: A Study in the Meaning of Ulysses (1957)

JJBN: SCHUTTE-1957

Schutte, M. William. Joyce and Shakespeare: A Study in the Meaning of Ulysses. New Haven: Yale UP, 1957. 

(Uploaded by MINAMITANI on 14 Mar 2013)

 

CONTENTS


Note on Form

1. Starting Point : the Current Status of Joyce Criticism

2. Stephen before“Scylla” 

3. Besteglyster : the Three Librarians

4. A Good Groatsworth of Wit

5. The Ordeal of StephenDedalus

6. The Artist's Role : the Dio Boia

7. Mr. Bloom and Shakespeare

8. Dublin, Shakespeare, and theMeaning of Ulysses

 

APPENDIX A. The Sources of Stephen's Shakespeare Theory

APPENDIX B. Shakespeare's Poems and Plays in Stephen Hero, the Portrait, and Ulysses.

INDEX

William T. Noon, S.J. /Joyce and Aquinas (1957)

JJBN: NOON-1957

Noon, S.J. William T. Joyce and Aquinas. New Haven; Yale UP, 1957.

 (Uploaded by MINAMITANI on 14 Mar 2013)


CONTENTS

 

Preface

Bibliographical Note

1. Steeled in the School of Old Aquinas

2. Dedalus and the Beauty Maze

3. A Pennyworth of Thomist Wisdom

4. How Culious an Epiphany

5. Academy of Letters

6. Sebellian Subtitles: The Tritarian Theme

7. The Wrunes of the World: The Theme of Creation

8. The Root Language of Shem

Kevin Sullivan / Joyce among the Jesuits (1958)

JJBN: SULLIVAN-1958

Sullivan, Kevin. Joyce among the Jesuits. New York: Columbia UP, 1958.

 (Uploaded by KOBAYASHI on 2 April 2015)

 

CONTENTS 

 

INTRODUCTION

1  CLONGOWES WOOD

2  THE BELVEDEREAN EXHIBITIONER

3  “JESUIT BARK AND BITTER BITE”

4  ON STEPHEN’S GREEN

St. Stephen’s AND THE L & H

APPENDIX   

BIBLIOGRAPHY

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

INDEX

 


ABOUT THE BOOKS


“You allude to me as a Catholic . . . now you ought to allude to me, for the sake of precision and to get the correct contour on me, you ought to allude me as a Jesuit.” – James Joyce

William York Tindall / A Reader's Guide to James Joyce (1959)

JJBN: TINDALL-1959

Tindall,  William York. A Reader's Guide to James Joyce. New York: The Noonday Press, 1959.

(Uploaded by KOBAYASHI on 21 Sepember 2011)

 

CONTENTS

 

PREFACE

Dubliners

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Stephen Hero: a note,

Exiles

Ulysses

Finnegans Wake

BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

First published in 1959, William York Tindall’s Reader’s Guide is still considered to be the best introduction to the complex writings of James Joyce. From Dubliners to Finnegans Wake, Tindall’s knowledge is as comprehensive as it is authoritative.

 

“Much of this detailed (often page-by-page) interpretation of Joyce’s works reads like a free but academic outline offered for discussion and comment, and this is its strength. . . . Tindall’s summary and interpretation of the books in the Joyce canon emphasizes allusions, relationships, and parallels in world literature and utilizes his extensive knowledge of psychology. Recommended.” – Herbert Cahoon, Library Journal

 

“An authoritative handbook.” – The Nation

 

William York Tindall was Professor of English at Columbia University and the author of numerous works on Joyce and British literature, including his groundbreaking Reader’s Guide to Finnegans Wake.

Ellsworth Mason & Richard Ellmann, ed. / The Critical Writings of James Joyce (1959)

JJBN: MASON&ELLMANN-1959

Mason, Ellsworth and Richard Ellmann. The Critical Writings of James Joyce. London: Faber, 1959.

 

CONTENTS

 

1. Trust Not Appearances (1896?); 2. Force (1989)

3. The Study of Languages (1898/99?);  4. Royal Hibernian Academy ‘Ecce Homo’ (1899)

5. Drama and Life )1900) ; 6. Ibsen’s New Drama (1900)

7. The Day of the Rabblement (1901) ; 8. James Clarence Mangan (1902)

9. An Irish Poet (1902) ; 10. George Meredith (1902) ; 11. Today and Tomorrow in Ireland (1903) 

12. A Suave Philosophy (1903) ; 13. An Effort at Precision in Thinking (1903)

14. Colonial Verses (1903)  ; 15. Catilina (1903); 16. The Soul of Ireland (1903)

17. The Motor Derby (1903) ; 18. Aristotle on Education (1903) ; 19. A Ne’er-Do-Well (1903)

20. Empire Building (1903) ; 21. New Fiction (1903) ; 22. The Mettle of the Pasture (1903)

23. A Peep Into History (1903) ; 24. A French Religious Novel (1903)

25. Unequal Verse (1903) ; 26. Mr. Arnold Graves’ New Work’ (1903) ; 27. A Neglected Poet (1903)

28. Mr. Mason’s Novels (1903) ;29. The Bruno Philosophy (1903) ; 30. Humanism (1903); 31. Shakespeare Explained (1903)

32. Borlase and Son (1903)  33. Aesthetics (1903/04: I. Paris Notebook; II. Pola Notebook)  34. The Holy Office (1904)

35. Ireland, Island of Saints and Sages (1907) ; 36. James Clarence Mangan [II] (1907)

37. Leninism ; 38. Home Rule Comes of Age (1907) ; 39. Ireland at the Bar (1907) ;  40. Oscar Wilde: The Poet of ‘Salome’ (

41. Bernard Shaw’s Battle with the Censor (1909) ; 43. William Blake (1912) ; 44. The Shade of Parnell (1912)  

45. The City of the Tribes (1912) ;46. The Mirage of the Fisherman of Aran (1912) ; 47. Politics and Cattle Disease (1912)

48. Gas from a Burner (1912) ; 49. Dooleysprudence (1916) ;

50. Programme Notes for the English Players (1918/19:  Barrie, The Twelve Pound Look; Synge, Riders to the Sea; Shaw. The Dark Lady of the Sonnets; Martyn, The Heather Field);  51. Letter on Pound (1925)  52. Letter on Hardy (1928);  53. Letter on Svevo (1929)

54. From a Banned Writer to a Banned Singer (1932);  55. Ad-Writer (1932); 56. Epilogue to Ibsen's Ghosts (1934) ;

57. Communication de M. James Joyce sur le Droit Moral des Ecrivains (1937)

Index