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1960s

William York Tindall / The Joyce Country (1960)

JJBN: TINDALL-1960

Tindall, William York. The Joyce Country. Schoken Books, New York, 1960.*右画像は新訂版1972年版の表紙。 (Uploaded by MINAMITANI, on 5 Apr.) 

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

With 88 Photographs

 

These photographs record many of the DUblin scenes that James Joyce wrote about. As Professor notes of Joyce in his preface. "No part of Dublinーno Dublinerーwas alien to him."

In these maervelous photographs, some of the structures no longer in existence, the Dublin of Joyce's time lives forever. 

S.L. Goldberg / The Classical Temper (1961)

JJBN: GOLDBERG-1961

Goldberg, S.L. The Classical Temper: A Study of James Joyce's Ulysses. London: Chatto and Windus, 1961. (Uploaded  by MINAMITANI on 5 Jun, 2013)

 

CONTENTS

 

I. Introductory

II. Art and Life: the aesthetics of the portrait.

III. Art and Freedom: the aethetics of Ulysses

IV. The modes of irony in Ulysses

V. Homer and teh nightmare of history

VI. Symbolism and Realism: a digression

VII. Structures and values

      Notes 

      Index

Frank O'Connor / The Lonely Voice (1962)

JJBN: O'CONNOR-1962

O'Connor, Frank. The Lonely Voice. Cleaveland: The World Publishing Company, 1962.

(Uploaded by MINAMITANI on 15 November 2011)

 

CONTENTS

 

INTRODUCTION

1. Hamlet and Quihote

2. Country Matters

3. The Slave's Son

4. You and Who Else?

5. Work in Progress

6. An Author in Seatch of a Subject

7. The Writer Who Rode Away

8. A Clean Well-Lighted Place

9. The Price of Freedom

10. The Romanticism of Violence

11. The Girl at the Gaol Gate 

EPILOGUE

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

If you read or write short stories, this is the valuable, entertaining, necessary book for you. 

 

Frank O'Connor's reputation as a master of the short story is undisputed. Now, applying his skill, awareness, and uncompromising standards to the work of otherness, the brilliant writer proves to be, as well, a perceptive critic of this special art. Here, stemming from his lectures on the art of the story, are provocative and illuminating studies of Chekhov, Maupassant, Turgenev, Kipling, Joyce, Mansfield, D. H. Lawrence, A. E. Coppard, and Hemingway―each filled with stimulating comments and insights which could spring only from the mind of a distinguished craftsman. 

 

  "The lonely voice" is that of the short story writer, who utilizes his medium as a private art intended to satisfy the standards of the individual, solitary, critical reader. Throughout these essays, each of which focuses upon one of the great masters, O'Connor attempts at an understanding of this special craft and offers telling comparisons with other literary forms. He particulary emphasizes the demands of the short-story form, for its very brevity is its greatest challenges, as "a whole lifetime must be crowded into a few minutes" and "those minutes must be carefully chosen indeed, and lit by an unearthly glow, one that enables us to distinguish present, past, and future as though they were all contemporaneous."

 

  Here is literary criticism at its finest―critical and historical comments on the craft of the short story which will be of value and interst to all who are concerned, as either writers or readers of short stories.

 

FRANK O'CONNOR (pseudonym of Michael O'Donovan) was born in Cork, Ireland, in 1903. Though he says that he received no education worth mentioning, he has spent a considerable portion of his life in educating others, and his present book is based on a course of lectures he gave at Stanford University in 1961.

  Mr. O'Connor's first published book was Guests of the Nation, a volume of short stories. He later published novels, several additional volumes of the tales, The Mirror in the Roadway (a study of the modern novel), verse, travel books, a study of Michael Collins and the Irish Revolution, and the autobiographical An Only Child. His latest critical book was Shakespeare's Progress. He has lived in the United Stated since 1952 and taught at Harvard as well as at Northwestern University. He is a Litt.D. of Dublin University. Readers of The New Yorker, Holiday, and Esquire are familiar with Mr. O'Connor's stories and sketches.

Marvin Magalaner and Richard Kain / Joyce: The Man, the Work, and the Reputation (1962)

JJBN:MAGALANER & KAIN-1962

Magalaner, Marvin and Richard Kain. Joyce: The Man, the Work, and the Reputation. New York: Collier Books, 1962. (Uploaded by MINAMITANI on 9 October 2011)

 

CONTENTS

 

Part I―The Man

1. The Joyce Enigma

2. The Problem of Biography

 

Part II―The Work

3. Poetry

4. Dubliners

5. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

6. Exiles

7. Ulysses

8. Approaches to Ulysses

9. Finnegans Wake

 

Part III―The Reputation

10. The Position of Joyce

     James Joyce: A Biographical Sketch

     Notes

     Bibliography

         The Problem of Biography

         Poetry

         Dubliners

         A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

         Exiles

         Ulysses

         Finnegans Wake

     Index

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

 Here, for the first time in one volume, is a full-length portrait of James Joyce, the man and his achievement, and a new, truly comprehensive survey of literary criticism about his works. It includes many fascinating details about his life―his rift with the Church, his alienation from Ireland, his stormy friendships―along with important previously unpublished letters.

  The authors offer perceptive guidance to Joyce's writings through systematic interpretations of each work, clarifying obscure passages. It is essential reading for anyone interested in Joyce as a man, as an artist, and as a major figure of the twentieth century.

  

 "Well-informed , perceptive, and enormously helpful...full of interest and stimulation."―David Daiches

Marvin Magalaner, ed. / A James Joyce Miscellany: Third Series (1962)

JJBN: MAGALANER-1962

Magalaner, Marvin, ed. A James Joyce Miscellany: Third Series. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 1962. 

(Uploaded by KOBAYASHI on 17 March 2015)


CONTENTS

 

Introduction / MARVIN MAGALANER

 1  Christmas Eve / JOHN J. SLOCUM AND HERBERT CAHOON

 2  The Broadsides of James Joyce / ROBERT SCHOLES

 3  Ibsen, Joyce, and the Living-Dead / JAMES R. BAKER

 4  Joyce's Sermon on Hell / JAMES R. THRANE

 5  The Characterization of Molly Bloom / JOSEPH PRESCOTT

 6  The Theme of Ulysses / WILLIAM EMPSON

 7  The Yankee Interviewer in Ulysses / RICHARD M. KAIN

 8  The Happy Hunting Ground / T. LENNAM

 9  Blake in Nighttown / MORTON D. PALEY

10  Joyce and Blake / ROBERT F. GLECKNER

11  In the Wake of the Fianna / VIVIAN MERCIER

12  Circling the Square: A Study of Structure / RUTH VON PHUL

13  Notes for the Staging of Finnegans Wake / DAVID HAYMAN


ABOUT THE BOOK

 

The main question for students of Joyce, says the editor of this volume, is no longer “What did he say?” but “How did he say it?” In this third selection from the latest research and study on the Irish writer, new biographical, critical, and historical findings are assembled. These essays represent new discoveries and suggest new directions for Joyce scholarship. Although each is important in itself, taken together the contributions give a significant picture of the state of Joyce studies today.

  Contributors to the present volume include John J. Slocum, Herbert Cahoon, Joseph Prescott, William Empson, Richard M. Kain, and Ruth von. Phul. Facsimile reproductions of manuscript pages of “Gas from a Burner” and a photograph of Joyce by Berenice Abbott are included in the illustrations to the book.

  In the present volume we find a previously unpublished fragment of a Joyce story, important new material on Joyce’s broadsides, including manuscript pages of “Gas from a Burner,” a detailed examination of the numerous changes Joyce made in manuscript and proofs in characterizing Molly Bloom, speculation on the connection between Joyce’s personal life and the theme of Ulysses, a deliberate parallel between Hamlet and an episode of Ulysses, discussions of the influence of Ibsen and Blake, the source of the sermon on Hell, an elucidation of some of the Dublin and other Irish allusions in Joyce’s work, and an examination of the structure of Joyce’s writings. Each essay presents a new facet of the curious individual that was Joyce, and all collectively give the reader a better opportunity to see the whole man.

  Because of its wide variety, the collection will interest everyone who enjoys reading and discussing modern literature. It will be particularly gratifying to the layman who desires more information to understand a difficult writer. And, finally, the volume will give the specialist an immediate and comprehensive glance at the direction of Joyce studies.


MARVIN MAGALANER has taught at Columbia University and New York University. He is presently Associate Professor of English at The City College of New York and editor for The James Joyce Society. He is author Time of Apprenticeship: The Fiction of Young James Joyce, and co-author (with R. M. Kain) of Joyce: The Man, the Work, the Reputation. Mr. Magalaner edited the first two Joyce Miscellanies.  

 

Robert Martin Adams / Surface and Symbol (1962)

JJBN: ADAMS-1962

Adams, Robert Martin. Surface and Symbol. New York: Oxford University Press, 1962.

 (Uploaded by KOBAYASHI on 4 September 2011)

 

CONTENTS

 

  Preface
  Preliminary

1. THE PROBLEM
  Boyd?
  Father Conmee and the Three Little Body
  Deasy
2. ANIMUS AND ANXIETY
  Father Malachi O’Flynn and Mr. Hugh C. Haines Love, M.A.
  The Twenty-five Lovers of Molly Bloom
  Treachery
3. PILING, SCAFFOLD, ADORNMENT
  Mrs. Sinico’s Accident, Miss Lizzie Twigg, and Other Figures of Fun
  Matthew Kane and Paddy Dignam
  Music, Musicians, and Some Other Performers
  Sinbad: Phantasmal Mirth
4. SYMBOL OR SURFACE
  Erin’s King
  Tom ROochford
  Blephen/Stoom
  Bloom as Hungarian, Bloom as Jew
  Dog-God
5. SCHOLAR, POET, WIT
  Stephen’s Originalities
  Joyce’s Scholarship
  Prudence and Vision
  Lists
6. CONSCIOUS ERROR, UNCONSCIOUS ERUDITION
  Myles Crawford and the Invincibles
  Bloom’s Bloopers
  Nosey Flynn, Polymath
  Dooleysprudence: The Vatican Council
  Dates and Numbers
7. AUTOLYCUS’ BAG
  Intaglio: Sunken Design
  The Allusive Trifle
  Special Names
  Newspapers and Guidebook
  Loose Ends, Namesakes, and Failures
8. CONCLUSION
  
  Appendix A—Samples from the Manuscript
  Appendix B—Variant Readings between Little Review and the Final Text
  Appendix C—The Rosenbach MS, the Little Review, and the Text
  Index   

 

ABOUT THE BOOK


The interpretation of James Joyce’s Ulysses has been going on now for nearly forty years; few novels have been questioned so deeply, so persistently, and on so impressive a range of topics. And yet, as any reader of the novel knows, the danger of losing one’s way in the obscurities of Joyce’s prose, the intricacy of his references, remains as great as ever. How ought we to read Ulysses? Should we pick our way slowly, passing over not even the slightest detail for fear of denying ourselves the richness of the novel, or push doggedly forward, holding to the main scheme and leaving the difficult loose ends for those with more erudition—and patience? What, in short, is the most economical and yet rewarding way to approach the book?
  Mr. Adams attempts an answer to such questions by investigating the consistency, that is, the texture, of Ulysses. By identifying some of the raw materials that went into the novel, materials taken from turn-of-the-century Dublin public records, newspapers, reminiscences, and other sources, and then comparing these originals with the finished text, he is able to define some of the ways in which the book was put together. As Mr. Adams observes, once the reader knows the basic materials Joyce started with, and has some idea of the quality of Joyce’s mind, he can at least begin to separate the surfaces from the symbols—the things which were put into the novel because they were social history, local color, or municipal detail, from the things which represent abstract concepts of special import to the novel.
  Having examined the transformations which these raw materials underwent in the mind of Joyce, Mr. Adams discusses the author’s artistic intent in the work and proposes what he thinks is the best way to read Ulysses. When we know that many of Joyce’s puzzles have merely private answers, or none at all, we are in a position to see how the book works, by deliberately frustrating the reader’s conscious mind, to release a passionate and visionary perception of earth’s sacramental vulgarity.
  Readers who have been confused by previous elaborate, wire-drawn symbolic systems, and readers who have simply been confused by Ulysses itself, will find Surface and Symbol a welcome guide to the great labyrinth.
  Richard Ellmann, Northwestern University, says of Mr. Adams's Surface and Symbol  “. . . he explains a lot of things that were incomprehensible, he traces a multitude of sources, he explores the relation of fact and fiction with great devotion and ingenuity. Everyone will have to reconsider his position about Ulysses.” 
  ROBERT M. ADAMS, who is Professor of English at Cornell university, has taught at the University of Wisconsin and at Rutgers University. He is the author of Stendhal: Notes on a Novelist; Liberal Anglicanism; Ikon: John Milton and the Modern Critics; and Strains of Discord.

Hugh Kenner / Flaubert, Joyce and Beckett: The Stoic Comedians (1962)

JJBN: KENNER-1962

Kenner, Hugh. Flaubert, Joyce and Beckett: The Stoic Comedians.London: Dalkey Archive Press, 1962.  *翻訳: KENNER-1998, ヒュー・ケナー『ストイックなコメディアンたち』富山英俊訳 未来社、1998年

 

CONTENTS

 

Preface

1. Gustave Flaubert: Comedian of the Enlightenment

2. James Joyce: Comedian of the Inventory

3. Samuel Beckett: Comedian of the Impasse

伊藤整編『ジョイス研究』(1962)

JJBN: ITO-1962

伊藤整編『ジョイス研究』英宝社、1962年、増訂版(初版:1955年)

 (Uploaded by MINAMITANI on 9 October 2011)

 

目次

 

序文 伊藤整

ジョイスの生涯と文学 永松定

ジョイスについて 西脇順三郎

ジョイスの手法と文体 辰宮栄

二つの発見 その他 福永和利

カトリシズムとジョイスの性格 伊藤整

ジョイスの同時代 春山行夫

英米文学にあたえたジョイスの影響 高村勝治

ジョイスの紹介と影響 太田三郎

同時代作家の見たジョイス 鈴木幸夫

詩人としてのジョイス 安藤一郎

十九世紀小説の頽廃と二十世紀小説の展開と 中村真一郎

自分の内部にあって自分ではないものとのたたかい 野間宏

作品研究『ダブリン市民』 安藤一郎

作品研究『若き芸術家の肖像』 丸谷才一

作品研究『ユリシーズ』 中村一夫

作品研究『フィネガンズ・ウェイク』町野静雄

作品研究『追放人』 鈴木幸夫

ジョイス文献抄 鈴木幸夫

年譜

索引

地図

A. Walton Litz / James Joyce (1966)

JJBN: LITZ-1966

Litz, A. Walton. James Joyce. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1966. (Uploaded by HIRASHIGE on 28 October 2011)


CONTENTS


Preface

Chronology

1. A Life of Allegory

2. Early Works

3. Dubliners

4. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

5. Exiles

6. Ulysses

7. Finnegans Wake

8. Joyce's Achievement

Notes and References

Selected Bibliography

Index

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

Based on both scholary research and the author's own experience in teaching Joyce, this general survey satisfies a need that has not been filled by numerous more specialized analyses. The complexity of Joyce's writing and the range of his learning are here approached from a consistent criticial viewpoint that connects his experiments with the main currents of English and European literature. The book opens with a chapter on Joyce's early life in Ireland, since the experiences of his youth provided the raw materials for all of his major works. An appraisal of Joyce's early poetry and youthful esthetic is followed by lengthy discussions of Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses, as well as integrated consideration of such lesser works as Stephen Hero and Exiles. A brief survey of Joyce's last book, Finnegans Wake, examines the critical questions raised by that notoriously difficult work.

 

This assessment of James Joyce's achievement emphasizes his central position in modern literature. The entire arc of Joyce's career is traced in a way that places his various books in relation to each other. Presented against the background of his life, they are seen as actually a recapitulation of some of the major movements in nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature. A Selected Bibliography with annotations serves as a useful guide through the maze of Joyce scholarship. 

Brendan O Hehir / A Gaelic Lexicon for Finnegans Wake: and Glossary for Joyce's other Works (1967)

JJBN: OHEHIR-1967

O Hehir, Brendan. Gaelic Lexicon for Finnegans Wake: and Glossary for Joyce's other Works. Berkeley: U of California P, 1967.

 

CONTENTS

 

Key to the Glossaries

Glossary for Finnegans Wake

Glossary for Joyce's Other Works

Supplements Notes
Additional Notes

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

Finnegan's Wake is a bafflingly complex work,  into which its author ported everything he knew. Even before its final publication as a book, in 1939, readers of Finnegans Wake were looking for clues to guide them through its mazes. 

 

Since all the language in the book, including the Gaelic, are masked and twisted, the eat is often a better interpreter than the eye in understanding the convolution of the language. Thus an ear that is attuned tot he sounds, cadences, vocabulary, and syntax of the Gaelic can determine, for example, that the phrase "Dorsan from Dunshanagan" is actually "Grasshopper from Ant's Fort" [Dorsán from Dún Seángain].

 

Mr. O Hehir has that kind of ear. Combining rare proficiency in Gaelic with equal proficiency in Joyce, he identifies and interprets all the Gaelicisms that Joyce used, and arranges them in the same simple and logical format employed in Helmut Bonheim's Lexicon of the German in Finnegans Wake [California, 1967]

 

Irish Words and phrases are listed successively as they occur according to the conventional page and line numbering established by Clive Hart's Concordance. The entries are arranged in three columns. In column one, the Irish or Irish-derived word or phrase is identified beside its page and line number. In column two, the conventional Irish spelling of the original is given, along with a simplified phonetic approximation of the pronunciation. In the third column, the word of phrase is translated into English, with explanation notes as required. Although Joyce's use of Irish is by no means always so straightforward as this arrangement suggests, anomalies are adapted to his pattern as conveniently and economically as possible. 

 

The main glossary is augmented by "Supplementary Notes," which take up certain matters that occur frequently in the book, such as variations on the Irish names for Dublin.

Ed. Peter K. Garrett / Twentieth Century Intepretations of Dubliners (1968)

JJBN: GARRETT-1968

Ed. Garrett, Peter K. Twentieth Century Intepretations of Dubliners. New Jersey: Prentice-Halls, 1968.

(Uploaded by MINAMITANI on 10 Feb, 2013)


CONTENTS

 

Introduction, by Peter Garrett
Work in Progress, by Frank O’Connor
Dubliners, by David Daiches
Dubliners, by Hugh Kenner
The Unity of Dubliners, by Brewster Ghiselin
The Artistry of Dubliners, by S.L. Goldberg
“Araby” and the “Extended Simile”, by Ben L. Kollins
“Two Gallants and “Ivy Day in the Committee Room,” by Robert Boyle, S.J
“Clay”: An Explication, by Florence L. Walzl
Structure and Sympathy in “The Dead,” by C.C. Loomis, Jr.

Chronology of Important Dates
Notes on the Editor and Contributors
Selected Bibliography

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

James Joyce's Dubliners, states Peter K. Garrett, "leaves behind the rhetoric of nineteenth-century ficition and concentrates intead on that precise rendering of the object which became the basis of much modern poetry as well as prose. " Recogninzing the importance of Joyce's achievement, the contributors to this collection of essays offer a provocative analysis of the fifteen separate, yet thematically unified, narratives of Dubliners. They provide a wide range of views on its structure and symbolism, its central theme of paralysis, and its portrayal of what Garrett calls "the city out of whose shabby reality Joyce wrought . . . an important character in the history of his art."

Constantine Curran / James Joyce Remembered (1968)

JJBN: CURRAN-1968

Curran, Constantine. James Joyce Remembered. London: Oxford University Press, 1968. 

 

CONTENTS

 

PART ONE

1 Joyce at University College

2 Later Days in Dublin

3 Joyce Leads Dublin

4 Joyce in Paris

 

PART TWO

5 Joyce's D'Annuzian Mask

6 Ibsen and Other

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

"I have written memories but not memories and touched only lightly on th e politics of my day. Thees are now radically and happily outmoded in the Dublin of today. But I have found an autobiographical element unavoidable and have diverged far from my original purpose in attempting to live over again in the climate which Joyce and I one inhabited, nd to breathe airs whose currents do not obviously blow through his writing." (From the Preface)

 

Warren Beck / Joyce’s Dubliners: Substance, Vision, and Art (1969)

JJBN: BECK-1969

Beck, Warren. Joyce’s Dubliners: Substance, Vision, and Art. Durham: Duke University Press, 1969. (Uploaded by MINAMITANI on 13 Mar, 2013)

 

CONTENTS


Introduction
The Sisters
An Encounter
Araby
Eveline
After the Race
Two Gallants
The Boarding House
A Little Cloud
Counterparts
Clay
A Painful Case
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
A Mother
Grace
The Dead
Notes

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

"This is the most successful single study to date of Joyce’s often undervalued collection of short stories illustrating moral paralysis in turn-of-the-century Dublin. Unlike ealier critics, Beck, an emeritus member of the faculty of Lawrence University as well as a published novelist, considers each of the 15 stories on its own merits, in terms of the artistic achievement each represents. Time and again, he convincingly demonstrates the limitations inherent in reading Dubliners solely as a prelude to Joyce’s later work. . . . He has many wise things to say about the stories and their author. This book belongs in every library serving students of modern literature." Literary Journal.


"This is an important work and may well become the standard departure point for all future critical studies of Dubliners.” The Virginia Quarterly


"Certainly this book is a necessary addition to any Joyce library." Choice


"Beck’s Joyce’s Dubliners is a significant study; it offers the first full scale evaluation of Joyce’s techniques as short story writer in a series of interesting and often very sensitive analyses of the Dubliners narratives. And not the least of its virtues is that it is as well  written as it is highly readable."  Modern Language Journal

Clive Hart / James Joyce's Dubliners: Critical Essays (1969)

JJBN: HART-1969

Hart, Clive. James Joyce's Dubliners: Critical Essays. London: Faber, 1969.

 (Uploaded by HIRASHIGE on 31 August 2011) 

 

CONTENTS

 

PREFACE Clive Hart
THE SISTERS John William Corrington
AN ENCOUNTER Fritz Senn
ARABY J.S. Atherton
EVELINE Clive Hart
AFTER THE Race Zack Bowen
TWO GALLANTS A. Walton Litz
THE BOARDING HOUSE Nathan Halper
A LITTLE CLOUD Robert Boyle, S.J.
COUNTERPARTS Robert Scholes
CLAY Adaline Glasheen
A PAINFUL CASE Thomas E. Connolly
IVY DAY IN THE COMMITTEE ROOM M.J.C. Hodgart
A MOTHER David Hayman
GRACE Richard M. Kain
THE DEAD Bernard Benstock

APPENDIX - Supplementary Notes

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

There are fifteen stories in the early volume which Joyce based on life in his native city: in this collection of essays each story is discussed by a distinguished critic of Joyce's work. The editor has attemted to impose no uniformity of approach on his fifteen contributors, but has preferred to encourage diversity of method. Attention is given to such varying aspects of Dubliners as social criticism, symbolism, mythic parallels, religious allegory, and political satire. The writers have obviously all enjoyed their task, and the book as a whole emphasizes once again the richness of Joyce's creative ability.

  The editor has contributed a short introduction, while an appendix provides explanations of many of Joyce's local and literary allusions.

 

NOTES

 

『ダブリナーズ』の各短編に対して異なる批評家による10ページほどの議論がなされている。他参考資料としてClive Hartらの編集による『ユリシーズ』版(JJBN: HART & HAYMAN-1974)でも本書の形式は踏襲されている。(H)

伊藤整編『ジョイス:20世紀英米文学案内9』(1969)

JJBN:ITO-1969

伊藤整編『ジョイス:20世紀英米文学案内9』研究社、1969年

(Uploaded by KOBAYASHI on 14th July 2013)

 

目次

 

人と生涯/伊藤整
作品
 『ダブリン市民』/安藤一郎
 『若き日の芸術家の肖像』/丸谷才一
 『ユリシーズ』/伊藤整
 『フィネガン徹夜祭』/鈴木幸夫・藤井かよ・柳瀬尚紀
 『追放人』/鈴木幸夫
 詩/安藤一郎
  『室内楽』『ポウムズ・ペニーイーチ』
評価/太田三郎
 年表・書誌/太田三郎
 索引