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Karen Lawrence, ed. / Transcultural Joyce (1998)

JJBN: LAWRENCE-1998

Lawrence, Karen, editor. Transcultural Joyce. Cambridge UP, 1998.

 

CONTENTS

 

List of contributors

Acknowledgments

1. Introduction: metempsychotic Joyce Karen Lawrence

Part I. Irish 'Compaliens':

2. James Joyce: the mystery of influence Eavan Boland

3. Joyce's ghost: the bogey of realism in John McGahern's Amongst Women Maria DiBattista

4. In transit: from James Joyce to Brigid Brophy Karen Lawrence

Part II. Postmodern, Post-Colonial Transpositions:

5. Cabrera Infante - unruly pupil Michael Wood

6. Barroco Joyce: Jorge Luis Borges' and José Lezama Lima's antagonistic readings Cesar Augusto Salgado

7. Postcolonial affiliations: Ulysses and All About H. Hatterr Srinivas Aravamudan

8. Rereading the exodus: Frankenstein, Ulysses, The Satanic Verses, and other postcolonial texts Ronald Bush

9. The art of memory: Joyce and Perec Jacques Mailhos

Part III. Transtextuality:

10. Anna Livia Plurabelle's sisters Rosa Maria Bollettieri Bosinelli

11. Anna Livia's French bifurcations Daniel Ferrer and Jacques Aubert

12. ALP Deutsch: ob uberhaupt möglich Fritz Senn

13. Anna Livia's Italian sister Rosa Maria Bollettieri Bosinelli

14. ALP in Roumanian (with some notes on Roumanian in Finnegan's Wake and in the notebooks) Laurent Milesi

15. The Spanish translation of Anna Livia Plurabelle Francisco Garcia Tortosa

16. The artistic integrity of Joyce's text in translation Di Jin

Bibliography

Index

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

 In Transcultural Joyce, a team of leading international scholars assess the afterlife of James Joyce and his writings within a multinational context. How does Joyce haunt the works of later writers in diverse literary traditions? How well does he translate from one culture and language to another? This book consider Joyce's reincarnations in texts from Latin America, Europe, and South Asia. Transcultural Joyce provides a fresh theoretical examination of conventional notions such as 'influence' and 'translation' and asks how Joyce is imported across particular cultural boundaries. As a canonical modernist and colonial subject, Joyce inhabits a borderline position that complicates his reception and revision by later writers. This book accounts for his cultural place as specifically Irish and more postcolonial than previous studies have acknowledged. Scholars and translators of Joyce also consider the formidable task of translating his work for a global audience.

 

  • Leading team of international scholars assess Joyce's international influence
  • Places Joyce in an Irish and postcolonial context
  • Contains essays on the translation and reception of Joyce in several countries 

Kathleen Ferris / James Joyce and the Burden of Disease (1995)

JJBN: FERRIS-1995

Ferris, Kathleen. James Joyce and the Burden of Disease. UP of Kentucky, 1995.

 

CONTENTS

 

List of Illustrations (pp. vi-vi)

Acknowledgments

Prologue

1 The Creative Daemon

2 The wandering Jew in Ulysses

3 Epics of the Body

4 An Insectfable

Epilogue: Dear mysterre Shame’s Voice

Chronology of Joyce’s Medical History

Notes

Bibliography

Index

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

James Joyce's near blindness, his peculiar gait, and his death from perforated ulcers are commonplace knowledge to most of his readers. But until now, most Joyce scholars have not recognized that these symptoms point to a diagnosis of syphilis. In what is sure to be a controversial work, Kathleen Ferris traces Joyce's medical history as described in his correspondence, in the diaries of his brother Stanislaus, and in the memoirs of his acquaintances, to show that many of his symptoms match those of tabes dorsalis, a form of neurosyphilis which, untreated, eventually leads to paralysis. Combining literary analysis and medical detection, Ferris builds a convincing case that this dread disease is the subject of much of Joyce's autobiographical writing. Many of his characters, most notably Stephen Dedalus and Leopold Bloom, exhibit the same symptoms as their creator: stiffness of gait, digestive problems, hallucinations, and impaired vision. Ferris also demonstrates that the themes of sin, guilt, and retribution so prevalent in Joyce's works are almost certainly a consequence of his having contracted venereal disease as a young man while frequenting the brothels of Dublin and Paris. By tracing the images, puns, and metaphors that occur in Ulysses and in Finnegans Wake, and by demonstrating their relationship to Joyce's experiences, Ferris shows the extent to which, for Joyce, art did indeed mirror life.

Kimberly J. Devlin and Marilyn Reizbaum, eds. / Ulysses—En-Gendered Perspectives: Eighteen New Essays on the Episodes (1999)

JJBN: DEVLIN-1999

Devlin, Kimberly J. and Marilyn Reizbaum, editors. Ulysses—En-Gendered Perspectives: Eighteen New Essays on the Episodes. U of South Carolina P, 1999.

 

CONTENTS

 

Series Editor's Preface

Preface

Abbreviations

"A Little Trouble about Those White Corpuscles": Mockery, Heresy, and the Transubstantiation of Masculinity in "Telemachus"

GARRY LEONARD

Genders of History in "Nestor"

ROBERT SPOO

Old Wives' Tales as Portals of Discovery in "Proteus"

CHERYL HERR

Milly, Molly, and the Mullingar Photo Shop: Developing Negatives in "Calypso"

CAROL SHLOSS

Skinscapes in "Lotus-Eaters"

MAUD ELLMANN

Visible Shades and Shades of Visibility: The En-Gendering of Death in "Hades"

KIMBERLY J. DEVLIN

Machines, Empire, and the Wise Virgins: Cultural Revolution in "Aeolus"

PATRICK MCGEE

Legal Fiction or Pulp Fiction in "Lestrygonians"

KAREN LAWRENCE

The Perils of Masculinity in "Scylla and Charybdis"

JOSEPH VALENTE

Diversions from Mastery in "Wandering Rocks"

BONNIE KIME SCOTT

Political Sirens

JULES LAW

When the Saints Come Marching In: Re-Deeming "Cyclops"

MARILYN REIZBAUM

A Metaphysics of Coitus in "Nausicaa"

JOHN BISHOP

Interesting States: Birthing and the Nation in "Oxen of the Sun"

ENDA DUFFY

Disenchanting Enchantment: The Theatrical Brothel of "Circe"

MARGOT NORRIS

The Double Life of "Eumaeus"

COLLEEN LAMOS

Sidereal Writing: Male Refractions and Malefactions in "Ithaca"

VICKI MAHAFFEY

Molly's Heavenly Body and the Economy of the Sign: The Invention of Gender in "Penelope"

CHRISTINE VAN BOHEEMEN

Notes

About the Contributors

Index

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

Groundbreaking perspectives on the controversial modern epic

Perhaps no literary work of the twentieth century has caused more controversy than James Joyce's Ulysses. The book America wanted to burn has instead earned a place as one of the most complex and most studied volumes of fiction. In this collection of essays each of the eighteen contributors offers new commentary on one of the episodes in Ulysses. Throughout Ulysses—En-Gendered Perspectives the common critical concern is with varying articulations of "femininities" and "masculinities" in Joyce's modernist epic. Each contributor attends to the extensive and various markings of gender in Ulysses and examines the ways in which such markings generate and en-gender other meanings.

 

Gender is treated as a form of overwriting, in senses that include both excess and layering. Here the differentiations of "masculine" and "feminine," their definitions and elaborations, are approached in multiple ways and in changing contexts. Familial roles, labor assignments, perceptual modes, colonialist categories, sexualities, ethnicities, ways of knowing and learning, scents, tastes, and eating habits are but a few of the cultural phenomena the scholars explore.

 

Ulysses—En-Gendered Perspectives affords insight into Joyce's masterpiece from the present-day perspective of gender issues and is responsive as well to other influential trends such as historicism, psychoanalysis, and culture critique. 

MargueriteHarkness / A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: Voices of the Text (1990)

JJBN: HARKNESS-1990

Harkness, Marguerite. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: Voices of the Text. G. K. Hall & Co., 1990.

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

Written in an easy-to-read, accessible style by teachers with years of classroom experience, Masterwork Studies are guides to the literary works most frequently studied in high school. Presenting ideas that spark imaginations, these books help students to gain background knowledge on great literature useful for papers and exams. The goal of each study is to encourage creative thinking by presenting engaging information about each work and its author. This approach allows students to arrive at sound analyses of their own, based on in-depth studies of popular literature. Each volume: -- Illuminates themes and concepts of a classic text -- Uses clear, conversational language -- Is an accessible, manageable length from 140 to 170 pages -- Includes a chronology of the author's life and era -- Provides an overview of the historical context -- Offers a summary of its critical reception -- Lists primary and secondary sources and index

Marilyn French / The Book as World: James Joyce's Ulysses (1993)

JJBN: FRENCH-1993

French, Marilyn. The Book as World: James Joyce's Ulysses. 1976. Paragon House, 1993.

 

CONTENTS

 

James Joyce: Mortal Immortal

Introduction to First Edition

[1] The Reader and the Journey

[2] The World as Book

[3] The Rock of Ithaca

[4] The City

[5] The World

[6] The Universe

[7] Coda: The Truth

Conclusion

Notes

Index

Table: The Two Journeys in Ulysses

Michael Gillespie, ed. / Joyce Through the Ages: Nonlinear View (1999)

JJBN: GILLESPIE-1999

Gillespie, Michael, editor. Joyce Through the Ages: Nonlinear View. UP of Florida, 1999.

 

CONTENTS

 

Foreword

Zack Bowen

Acknowledgements

List of Abbreviations

Introduction 

Michael Patrick Gillespie

Chaos Versus Complexity

James Joyce and the Consumption History

Michael Patrick Gillespie

Growing Up Together—Joyce and Psychoanalysis, 1900-1922

Jean Kimball

Chaos Theory and the Heroism of Leopold Bloom

Peter Francis Mackey

The Uncertainty Principle

Adolescence, Humour and Adolescent Humour - One Way of Carving a Turkey

Roy Gottfried

The Conscience of the Race - the Nation as Church of the Modern Age

Pericles Lewis

Stephen, Simon and Eileen Vance -Autoeroticism in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Michael H. Begnal

A Polysymbolic Character - Irish and Jewish Folklore in the Apparition of Rudy

Tara Williams

Strange Attractors

Inventing Patrimony - Joyce, Mangan and Irish Nationalism

Heyward Ehrlich

Joyce Redux - Success and Failure as Three American Writers Evoke Joyce

Vivian Valvano Lynch

Snow Through the Ages - Echoes of "The Dead" in O'Brien,

Lavin and O'Faolain

Sandra Manoogian Pearce

Joyce's Hitler

John Gordon

Words Cited

Contributors

Index

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

This selection of essays focuses broadly on social, cultural and historical aspects of age and ageing, using nonlinear perspectives to explore how each topic might be applied to James Joyce and his writings. With a special view that examines non-traditional connections suggested by chaos theory as applied to the humanities, these writers offer a new and unconventional reading of the Joyce canon.

Mitzi Brunsdale / James Joyce: A Study of the Short Fiction (1993)

JJBN: BRUNSDALE-1993

Brunsdale, Mitzi. James Joyce: A Study of the Short Fiction. Twayne Publishers, 1993.

 

CONTENTS

 

Preface xi

Acknowledgments xvii

Ireland's Bards xxi

PART 1. THE SHORT FICTION

Dubliners

Prelude 3

"The Sisters" 7

"Two Gallants" 14

"Ivy Day in the Committee Room"

"A Little Cloud"

"The Dead" 36

Interlude 47

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Interlude 52

The Artist as Child 56

The Adolescent Portrait 63 "The Obscene Hells of Our Holy Mother"

"Revealing Himself to Himself" 80

The Artist as Alchemist 87

Postlude 100

PART 2. THE WRITER

Introduction

"Ibsen's New Drama" 151

"Paris Notebook" 154

"A Portrait of the Artist"

"Pola Notebook" 165

Letters, 1905-1906

Stephen Hero 172

"Trieste Notebook"

Letters, 1913-1917

PART 3. THE CRITICS

Dubliners

Introduction

Brewster Ghiselin

Florence L. Walzl

Morris Beja

Mary T. Reynolds

Donald T. Torchiana 198

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Introduction

Harry Levin 202

Maurice Beebe

Wayne Booth

Marguerite Harkness 208

Suzette Henke

Patrick Parrinder 210

Bernard Benstock 212

Richard Brown

David W. Robinson 214

Richard F. Peterson

Chronology 221

Glossary of Roman Catholic Terminology

Selected Bibliography 247

Index 

Neil Davison / James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity: Culture, Bilgraphy, and "The Jew" in Modernist Europe

JJBN: DAVISON-1996

Davison, Neil. James Joyce, Ulysses, and the Construction of Jewish Identity: Culture, Bilgraphy, and "The Jew" in Modernist Europe. Cambridge UP, 1996. 

 

CONTENTS

 

Foreword Anthony Julius

Introduction

1. Silence: family values

2. Silence: Jesuit years: Clongowes and Belvedere

3. Silence: university years: the Church, Dreyfus, and aesthetics

4. Exile: excursion to the Continent, bitter return

5. Cunning and exile: Greeks and Jews

6. Cunning: Jews and the Continent: texts and subtexts

7. Cunning: the miracle of Lazarus times two: Joyce and Italo Svevo

8. Ulysses

Conclusion

Notes

 

Bibliography

Index

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

  

Representations of 'the Jew' have long been a topic of interest in Joyce studies. Neil Davison argues that Joyce's lifelong encounter with pseudo-scientific, religious and political discourse about 'the Jew' forms a unifying component of his career. Davison offers new biographical material, and presents a detailed reading of Ulysses showing how Joyce draws on Christian folklore, Dreyfus Affair propaganda, Sinn Fein politics, and theories of Jewish sexual perversion and financial conspiracy. Throughout, Joyce confronts the controversy of 'race', the psychology of internalised stereotype, and the contradictions of fin-de-siècle anti-Semitism.

Peter I. Barta / Bely, Joyce, and Döblin: Peripatetics in the City Novel

JJBN: BARTA-1996

Barta, Peter I. Bely, Joyce, and Döblin: Peripatetics in the City Novel. UP of Florida, 1996.

 

CONTENTS

 

Contents

Foreword, by Zack Bowen xi

Preface xiii

1. The Emergence of the Modernist City Novel and Its Peripatetic Hero 1 2. Knights and Unicorns: The Walkers of Petersburg 19

3. Ulysses: The City of the Wandering Aengus and the Wandering Jew 47

4. Walking in the Shadow of Death: Berlin Alexanderplatz 76

Conclusion 99

Notes 103

Bibliography 107

Index 119

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

This work examines the narrative apparatus in three modernist European city novels - Bely's "Petersburg", Joyce's "Dublin" and Döblin's "Berlin". It argues that the narrative combination of rambling, thinking and talking creates a "peripatetic" perspective, a manner of facing oneself to the world.

R. B. Kershner, ed. / Joyce and Popular Culture (1996)

JJBN: KERSHNER-1996

Kershner, R. B., editor. Joyce and Popular Culture. UP of Florida, 1996.

 

CONTENTS

 

Theoretical Approaches

1. Theoretical Approaches to Popular Culture

Derek Attridge;

2. A Tale of "Unwashed Joyceans"—James Joyce, Popular Culture and Popular Theory

David Glover

3. A(dorna) to Ž(ižek)—From the Culture Industry to the Joyce Industry, and Beyond

Michael Walsh

Popular Sources and Paradigms

4. Should Boys Have Sweethearts?

Chester G. Anderson

5. Molly Bloom and Lady Hester Stanhope

Michael H. Begnal

6. "Nothing for a Woman in That"—James Lowebirch and Masochistic Fantasy in "Ulysses"

Stephen Watt

7. Dr. J. Collins Looks at J. J.: The Invention of a Shaun

David Hayman.

The Context of Culture

8. Wilde About Joyce

Zack Bowen

9. The (Tom) Swiftean Comedy of "Scylla and Charybdis"

Thomas Jackson Rice

10. Advertising and Religion in James Joyce's Fiction: The New (Improved) Testament

Garry M. Leonard

11. Joyce's Techno-Poetics of Artifice: Machines, Media, Memory and Modes of Communication in "Ulysses" and "Finnegan's Wake"

Donald Theall

Joyce in Popular Culture

12. Appropriating the Master Appropriator: "The James Joyce Murder" as Feminist Critique

Helene Meyers

13. James Joyce as Woman: Fionnula Flanagan, Joyce and Film

Adrian Peever

14. Marilyn Monroe Reading Ulysses: Goddess or Postcultural Cyborg?

Richard Brown

15. The Joycean Unconscious, or Getting Respect in the Real World

Vincent J. Cheng

Notes

Contributors

Index

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

Joyce not only used popular culture, he contributed to it. These essays employ a variety of critical techniques to bring out his involvement in the popular culture of his time. Treating all of Joyce's work from Dubliners through Finnegan's Wake, they question the conventional idea that popular culture is the inverse of modernist high art, showing instead how popular culture intertwines with modernist (and postmodernist) art. In a general historical introduction, R.B. Kershner looks at the entire question of Joyce and popular cutlure within the context of Joyce criticism and the cultural studies movement.

Robert Newman, ed. / Pedagogy, Praxis, Ulysses: Using Joyce's Text to Transform the Classroom (1996)

JJBN: NEWMAN-1996

Newman, Robert, editor. Pedagogy, Praxis, Ulysses: Using Joyce's Text to Transform the Classroom. U of Michigan P, 1996. 

 

CONTENTS

 

Illustrations - ix

Introduction

Robert Newman - I

I. BEGINNINGS, NARRATIVES, IDENTITIES - 7

"In the buginning is the woid": Opening Lines and the Protocols of Reading

Michael patrick Gillespie - 9

Ulysses and the Preemptive Power of Plot

Kevin J. H. Dettmar - 21

Teaching Joyce Teaching Kristeva: Estrangement in the Modern World

Carol Shloss - 47

Bread and Wine, Coke and Peanuts: Teaching Sacrificial Feasts

Margaret Mills Harper - 63

2. CIVILIZATION AND ITS (DIS)CONTEXTS - 77

Theater of the Mind: "Circe" and Avant-Garde Form

Margot Norris - 79

Women in Rooms, Women in History

Susan Shaw Sailer - 97

Teaching Freud through "Nausicaa"

Brian W. Shaffer - 121

3. IDEOLOGY AND VOICE - 133

Decolonizing Literature: Ulysses and the Postcolonial Novel in English

M. Keith Booker - 135

Teaching Howards End through Ulysses through Bakhtin

R. Brandon Kershner - 153

Dialogic Monologue, or Divided Discourse in Ulysses and Othello

Sheldon Brivic - 167

4. VISUALIZING PEDAGOGY - 179

Reading the Text of Ulysses, "Reading" Other "Texts": Representation and the Limits of Visual and Verbal Narratives

Roy Gottfried - 181

Ulysses, Cubism, and MTV

Archie K. Loss - 195

Discovering Body Tropes through Ulysses

Robert Newman - 207

5. CLASSIFICATION AND INVENTION - 223

"Cyclops," "Sirens," and the Myths of Multicultural Modernism

Craig Werner - 225

Ulysses, Order, Myth: Classification and Modern Literature

E. P. Walkiewicz - 241

The Heuretics of Odyssey: Ulysses in Florida

Gregory L. Ulmer - 253

Contributors - 267

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

Much theoretical debate has occurred about James Joyce's Ulysses as a model for reading. Critics often cite it as the ideal writerly text, where, according to Barthes, the reader becomes actively involved in producing meaning rather than a mere consumer of words. Post-structuralist, Marxist, and feminist theorists variously see the novel as the place to discover the infinite deferral of understanding, the polyphonic text that liberates the reader from narrow ideological meaning, or the work that undercuts prevalent psychoanalytical notions of language and offers new interpretive strategies. In many ways, Ulysses is a chameleon text, accommodating multiple interpretations while permitting infinite possibilities for discovery.

 

Pedagogy, Praxis, Ulysses approaches Joyce's novel not simply as a text to be examined, but as a touchstone to generate theoretical and practical ideas for innovation in teaching. The collection employs Ulysses as a springboard for thought- provoking questions about how we read, learn, and teach--and about how new, open-minded approaches to pedagogy can communicate to students the value of interpreting as a strategy of survival, and questioning as a vital technique for experiencing life.

 

Contributors to the volume are M. Keith Booker, Sheldon Brivic, Kevin Dettmar, Michael Patrick Gillespie, Roy Gottfried, Margaret Mills Harper, R. Brandon Kershner, Archie Loss, Patrick Lynch, Robert Newman, Margot Norris, Jörg Rademacher, Susan Shaw Sailer, Brian Schaffer, Carol Schloss, Gregory Ulmer, E. P. Walkiewicz, Craig Werner, and Jennifer Wicke.  

Scott Klein / The Fiction of James Joyce and Wyndham Lewis: Monsters of Nature and Design (1994)

JJBN: KLEIN-1994

Klein, Scott. The Fiction of James Joyce and Wyndham Lewis: Monsters of Nature and Design. Cambridge UP, 1994.

 

CONTENTS

 

Acknowledgements

List of abbreviations

Introduction: opposition and representation

1. The tell-tale Eye

2. The mirror and the razor

3. The cracked looking-glass of the master

4. Minds of the anti-collaborators

Conclusion

Notes

Bibliography 

Index 

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

The literary relationship of James Joyce and Wyndham Lewis has previously been described in merely biographical terms. In The Fictions of James Joyce and Wyndham Lewis Scott W. Klein takes Wyndham Lewis's criticism of Ulysses in Times and Western Man and Joyce's implicit response to Lewis in Finnegans Wake as an emblematic opposition signalling significant textual relations within and between the fictions of the two authors. The seeing eye and the world, the creating mind and fiction, language and its aesthetic and political object, and the processes of history: all appear in the work of both Joyce and Lewis, as related thematic structures that raise questions about binarism, dialectic, and the reconciliation of opposites. Detailed examination of key texts by Joyce and Lewis reveals affiliations between the two writers, and offers insight into the politics and aesthetics of modernism.

 

  • Explores the textual relationship between Wyndham Lewis and James Joyce
  • Revises our understanding of the work of both authors, but particularly Joyce's Finnegans Wake
  • Offers an insight into aesthetics and politics in literary modernism

Sebastian Knowles, ed. / Bronze by Gold: The Music of Joyce (1999)

JJBN: KNOWLES-1999

Knowles, Sebastian, editor. Bronze by Gold: The Music of Joyce. Garland Publishing, 1999.

 

CONTENTS

 

Abbreviations

Editorial Conventions

List of Figures

Series Editor's Foreword Daniel Albright

Acknowledgments

Introduction

Sebastian D. G. Knowles

 

PART I Bronze: Music

Section 1: Joyce's Musical Background

Chapter 1: James Joyce and Dublin Opera, 1888-1904

Seamus Reilly

Chapter 2: Joyce's Trieste: Città Musicalissima

John McCourt

Section 2: Joyce and His Contemporaries

Chapter 3: Chamber Music: Words and Music Lovingly Coupled

Myra T. Russel

Chapter 4: "Mr. Bloom and the Cyclops": Joyce and Antheil's Unfinished "Opéra Mécanique"

Paul Martin

Chapter 5: Opus Posthumous: James Joyce, Gottfried Keller, Othmar Schoeck, and Samuel Barber

Sebastian D. G. Knowles

Section 3: Contemporary Music and Joyce

Chapter 6: The Euphonium Cagehaused in Either Notation: John Cage and Finnegans Wake

Scott W. Klein

Chapter 7: Davies, Berio, and Ulysses

Murat Eyuboglu

 

PART II Gold: Text

Section 1: Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

Chapter 8: Noise, Music, Voice, Dubliners

Allan Hepburn

Chapter 9: The Distant Music of the Spheres

Thomas Jackson Rice

Section 2: Ulysses

Chapter 10: Bronze by Gold by Bloom: Echo, the Invocatory

Drive, and the 'Aurteur' in "Sirens"

Susan Mooney

Chapter 11: Strange Words, Strange Music: The Verbal Musicof "Sirens"

Andreas Fischer

Chapter 12: Mining the Ore of "Sirens": An Investigation of Structural Components

Margaret Rogers

Chapter 13: "Circe," La Gioconda, and the Opera House of the Mind

John Gordon

Section 3: Finnegans Wake

Chapter 14: Parsing Persse: The Codology of Hosty's Song

Zack Bowen and Alan Roughley

Chapter 15: Synthesizing "The Ballad of Persse O'Reilly"

Daniel J. Schiff

Suzzete A. Henke / James Joyce and the Politics of Desire (1990)

JJBN: HENKE-1990

Henke, Suzette A. James Joyce and the Politics of Desire. Routledge, 1990.

 

CONTENTS

 

Acknowledgements

Abbreviations

Introduction: Defusing the Patriarchal Can(n)on

1. Through a Cracked Looking-Glass: Desire and Frustration in Dubliners 

2. Stephen Dedalus and Women: A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Narcissist

3. Interpreting Exiles: The Aesthetics of Unconsummated Desire

4. Uncoupling Ulysses: Joyce’s New Womanly Man

5. Molly Bloom: The Woman’s Story

6. Reading Finnegans Wake: The Feminiairity which Breathes Content Ricorso: Anna Livia Plurabelle and Ecriture Feminine

Notes

Bibliography

Index

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

 

This title, first published in 1990, offers a feminist and psychoanalytic reassessment of the Joycean canon in the wake of Freud, Lacan, and Kristeva. The author centres her discussion of Ulysses, Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist, Finnegans Wake, and Exiles around questions of desire and language and the politics of sexual difference.

 

Suzette Henke’s radical "re-vision" of Joyce’s work is a striking example of the crucial role feminist theory can play in contemporary evaluation of canonical texts. As such it will be welcomed by feminists and students of literature alike.